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Tyre repairs,replacement, Wheel Alignments

Puncture Repairs

Puncture Repairs

Replacement

Mag wheels

Wheel Balancing

Wheel Balancing

Wheel Alignment

Wheel Alignment

Emergency Services

Emergency Services

Replacement

Tyres & Balancing

Your tyre may not need to be replaced.

New Tyres

    Hm Auto can supply and fit all manner of new tyres, from cars, utes and 4wds to ATVS, wheelbarrows and even light tractors.  

    We work with multiple suppliers to be able to provide most brands of tyres at a competitive price, give us a call to discuss your needs. Read more below

    Your tyre may not need to be replaced.

    Get your wheels balanced.

      Wheel balancing, which can also be known as tyre balancing, is the process of equalizing weights in the wheel assembly so that it spins smoothly while you’re on the road at high speed.

      Improperly balanced tyres can lead to vibration, excessive tyre wear, damage to suspension and other problems.

       

      We provide wheel balancing at our workshop, just North of central Rolleston. To see more about the services we provide at our workshop click here ➝

      Your tyre may not need to be replaced.

      Mag wheels

        Hm Auto  can supply replacedment after market wheels to make your vehicle look how you want it to

        Wheel Alignments

         

          Why is Wheel Alignment Important? Maintaining proper wheel alignment is essential to avoid unnecessary wear on your tyres, steering, suspension and brakes. Accurate wheel alignment optimises driving stability, maximises tyre life and improves your vehicle’s overall handling performance.

          Tyres supplies and their brands

          Some of our supplies and their brands

          Tyremax

          Brands: Hifly, Vitora, goodyear, general tire, Maxxis , Continental

          Bridgestone

          Potenza, Ecopia, Firestone, Supercat, Turanza
          Blairs
          Kumho tyres, Goodride, Petlas, Zetum, Duro

          YHI

          Toyo Tires.,Pirelli, Nankang, Radar, Nitto, Longmarch, Farroad, Accelera

          Value tyres

          Laufenn, Hankook, Gopro , Royalblack, Triangle, Atlas tires

          TyreLine

          Michelin, BFGoorich, Infinity

          WHEEL ALIGNMENT

          WHEEL ALIGNMENT: WHAT IS IT AND WHY IT IS IMPORTANT?
          WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF A CAR OUT OF ALIGNMENT?
          HOW IS WHEEL ALIGNMENT DONE?

          CAMBER TOE CASTER

          HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO GET AN ALIGNMENT?
          IS WHEEL ALIGNMENT NECESSARY?
          HOW OFTEN SHOULD YOU GET AN ALIGNMENT?
          HOW LONG DOES AN ALIGNMENT TAKE?
          HOW LONG SHOULD THE ALIGNMENT LAST?
          WHAT HAPPENS IF I DON’T GET MY WHEELS ALIGNED?
          HOW FAST WILL TYRES WEAR OUT WITH BAD ALIGNMENT?
          DO I NEED A TWO-WHEEL OR FOUR-WHEEL ALIGNMENT?
          CAN TYRE ALIGNMENT CAUSE VIBRATION?
          DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WHEEL ALIGNMENT AND TYRE BALANCING

          WHEEL ALIGNMENT: WHAT IS IT AND WHY IT IS IMPORTANT?

          A wheel alignment is a mechanical adjustment of your suspension system (the parts that connect your wheels to your car) to ensure that your wheels are in the correct position. It can also be called tracking or tyre alignment. Wheel alignments are important because wheels that are out of alignment can cause issues such as making your tyres wear out quickly or unevenly and lead to a less pleasant experience of driving or riding in your car.

          WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF A CAR OUT OF ALIGNMENT?
          One of the signs that your car may be out of alignment is if it is constantly pulling to one side or another on the straight. Your steering wheel can also tell you that you have an alignment issue, for example, if it appears off-centre when driving straight or vibrating. However, these problems could occur for various reasons, so read on for other tell-tale signs of alignment issues.
          You can spot alignment problems by visually inspecting your tyre tread when your vehicle is stationary. Certain sections that are more “worn-down” than others or a difference in tread depth from the inside to the front edge of the tyre are signs of different alignment problems.
          You may even be able to hear an alignment issue because misaligned wheels can cause tyres to screech in situations where they normally would not.

          HOW IS WHEEL ALIGNMENT DONE?
          Wheel alignments are not a do-it-yourself project; the process is more involved than just making sure that your wheels are parallel and pointing straight ahead.
          Alignment must be carried out on approved equipment by trained personnel to return the vehicle to OEM specification. There are three main factors at play in this process.

          CAMBER
          Camber is the term for how far the wheel tilts outward away from the vehicle, or how far it leans inward toward it. Getting the camber angle right is important for guaranteeing that your car will corner safely. A camber angle that is off can cause a ring of wear towards the inside or outside edge of your tyre, depending on which way the excess slant goes.

          TOE
          Toe angle is what most people first associate with alignments, and it has to do with whether the wheels are pointing straight ahead or not. Your wheels should neither excessively “Toe-in” nor “Toe-out”, if they do, they need to be set back to the
          original OEM specification. Toe alignment problems are the ones that can most quickly chew through your tyre’s tread so it is important to get them corrected.

          Correction of the vehicle thrust line and camber/toe angles may actually bring the caster angle back to specification; otherwise, there will be a further underlying issue.

          HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO GET AN ALIGNMENT?
          The cost of aligning your tyres can vary based on several factors: the scope of the job, your location, the company or mechanic doing the work and even the make and model of your car and the type of tyres that you are running. However, compared to many other repair or maintenance jobs, alignment is relatively inexpensive. A rough guide to cost’s are around $65 for a Front Toe alignment, and over three times that for a full alignment (front toe, rear toe and camber).

          IS WHEEL ALIGNMENT NECESSARY?

          The three Cs of why you need to align your tyres are caution, cash and comfort:Caution: since bad alignment can lead to accelerated or uneven tyre wear, it can compromise the tyre’s grip on the road, especially in slippery conditions. In severe cases, it can even lead to a blowout, so alignment is necessary as a safety precaution.
          Cash: accelerated wear also means that you’ll have to spend more to replace your tyres more frequently, so alignment is necessary from a financial standpoint as well. Dragging a misaligned vehicle will create scrubbing, causing resistance to the road surface and thereby decreasing vehicle fuel efficiency. Comfort: finally, misaligned tyres can make your car’s movements jerky or cause vibration. An alignment may help to improve this if there are no other issues behind the problem.

          HOW OFTEN SHOULD YOU GET AN ALIGNMENT?
          There is no set formula for how often you need to align your car’s wheels – it all depends on your normal driving conditions and habits. Many mechanics recommend an alignment check after every time your car has a service, although if you often drive on rough roads or cover over average miles on your car, you may consider getting an alignment much more frequently. From a mechanical perspective, there is no such thing as too many alignments.
          Regardless of when you did your last alignment, you’ll want to realign after replacing tyres, replacing parts of the steering or suspension system, or after driving incidents like particularly hard blows to the wheel or accidents.

          HOW LONG DOES AN ALIGNMENT TAKE?
          An alignment is not a time-consuming procedure and should typically take an hour or less. A four-wheel alignment (as opposed to a front wheel one) will take a little longer and if the mechanic finds broken or worn-out parts in the suspension system, replacing them will take longer as well.

          HOW LONG SHOULD THE ALIGNMENT LAST?

          Again, there is no magic number for how long your alignment will last. It comes down to how and where you drive your car. Vehicles that have been driven hard over speed bumps or on rough roads will have more frequent misalignments, while the alignments on cars driven more conservatively should be less frequent, barring any incidents.

          WHAT HAPPENS IF I DON’T GET MY WHEELS ALIGNED?

          If you do adjust your alignment when it falls out of the manufacturer’s specification, your tyres can begin to wear down considerably faster and unevenly, so its best practice to get it checked. Uneven wear can affect safety and make your ride less smooth, since crooked wheels can cause jerking and chattering. An incorrect alignment also means that you will have to replace your tyres sooner than expected.
          If you do the maths, spending the £35 or so on getting your wheels aligned is well worth it when you compare it to the cost of having to prematurely buy and install a new set of tyres.

          HOW FAST WILL TYRES WEAR OUT WITH BAD ALIGNMENT?

          The wear on your tyres caused by alignment issues depends on the severity of the problem. Over time, even a minor issue can take thousands of miles off a tyre’s life but a major misalignment, especially in the toe angle, can chew through your tyre tread depth in just a few hundred miles if you don’t get it fixed. You might be able to detect a problem severe enough to cause this kind of damage just bylooking at the wheels on your parked car to see if they look parallel or not.
          DO I NEED A TWO-WHEEL OR FOUR-WHEEL ALIGNMENT?
          The type of vehicle that you drive determines the kind of alignment you need. During a two-wheel (or front-end) alignment, the mechanic only recalibrates the front wheels. This is usually recommended for trucks or heavy-duty SUVs with a solid rear axle without independent suspension. Cars with independent suspension or all- wheel drive require a four-wheel alignment. Most passenger vehicles fall into this category. Your mechanic should be able to help you decide which service is needed.
          CAN TYRE ALIGNMENT CAUSE VIBRATION?
          Yes. When your wheels are out of alignment, they are often pulling against each other or being partly dragged along the road surface. This can have several consequences for the car’s handling and feel, including a steering wheel that vibrates or the whole car shaking as it goes down the motorway.

          DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WHEEL ALIGNMENT AND TYRE BALANCING

          The problems caused by imbalanced tyres and out-of-alignment wheels can be similar: poor fuel economy, rapid or uneven wear, vibrations in the steering wheel, or other handling problems. However, the underlying issues and their remedies are quite different. Tyre balancing: whenever you fit new tyres, the wheels must go through a balance procedure, this is required to counter act uneven masses within the tyre and rim assembly so that the wheel will run smoothly when driving. A technician will use a balance machine to detect the imbalance then apply weights to the wheel correct. A wheel alignment, on the other hand, corrects the various angles of contact that a tyre has with the road surface, which is a completely different procedure requiring specialist equipment.

          3. CASTER

          Your caster angle helps balance steering, stability, and cornering. Specifically, it’s the
          angle of your steering axis when viewed from the side of your vehicle. If you have
          positive caster, the steering axis will tilt toward the driver. Negative caster, on the
          other hand, means the steering axis tilts toward the front of your vehicle.

          WHY TIRE ALIGNMENT MATTERS

          Improper wheel or tire alignment can cause your tires to wear unevenly and
          prematurely. Here are some specific types of undue tread wear attributable to
          misalignment:

          Tire Alignment: What You Need to Know

          MAINTAINING YOUR VEHICLE

          Tire alignment, also known as wheel alignment, can help your tires perform properly and help them last longer. It can also improve handling and keep your vehicle from pulling in one direction or vibrating strangely on the road.

          WHAT IS TIRE ALIGNMENT?

          Alignment refers to an adjustment of a vehicle’s suspension – the system that connects a vehicle to its wheels. It is not an adjustment of the tires or wheels themselves. The key to proper alignment is adjusting the angles of the tires which affects how they make contact with the road.

          HOW DO I KNOW IF I NEED A TIRE ALIGNMENT?

          There are a couple ways to tell if your car needs a tire alignment. If you've noticed one or more of these indicators, you should have your alignment checked by a licensed service technician immediately.

          Uneven tread wear
          Vehicle pulling to the left or right
          Your steering wheel is off center when driving straight
          Steering wheel vibration

          CAMBER, TOE, CASTER

          When a technician checks your tire alignment, he or she is mainly concerned with three things:
          1. CAMBER
          This is the inward or outward angle of the tire when viewed from the front of the vehicle. Too much inward or outward tilt, also known as negative and positive camber, respectively, indicates improper alignment and will need to be adjusted.

          Worn bearings, ball joints, and other wheel-suspension parts may contribute to camber misalignment.

          2. TOE
          Distinct from camber alignment, toe alignment is the extent to which your tires turn
          inward or outward when viewed from above. If that’s confusing, just stand up and
          look down at your feet. Angle them inward toward the center of your body. When the
          tires on your car are angled the same way (remember, we’re thinking in terms of
          birds-eye-view), we call this toe-in alignment. Angle your feet outward and you have
          toe-out alignment. Both require adjustment.

          Tyre Pressure & Your New Tyres
          Keeping an eye on the pressure of your new tyres will play a big part in
          getting the most out of them.
          Under Inflated tyres cause uneven wear as the shoulders of the tyres take
          the beating.  The centre will show much less wear.  Very annoying.
          Even worse than uneven wear is what underinflated tyres do to the handling
          of your vehicle.  Steering will become less responsive and stability can
          become compromised.  There;s also another hit to your pocket.  An
          underinflated tyre will increase your fuel consumption, meaning more
          frequent visits to the dreaded petrol station pumps.
          On the flipside, is over inflated tyres.  You pretty much reverse the wear
          pattern on the tyres.  This time, the centre takes the beating and wears down
          whilst the shoulders are raised from contact with the road.  Again, it means
          uneven wear and the return of that annoying loss of value through having to
          throw good rubber away because of a small bit of bad.
          There’s a nasty complication to this scenario too.  With reduced contact
          between tyre and road, there’s reduced traction.  Your tyre will not be
          performing as it has been designed to and you risk losing it on a corner or
          failing to stop in an emergency braking situation.

          The only way to prevent the above is to inflate your tyres to the correct
          pressure.  You may get some friends who offer advice on what the best tyre
          pressure is.  Everyone will have an opinion.  Want to know the best answer?
          Stick with what your vehicle manufacturer recommends.  They did their
          design work and likely worked with a tyre company along the way.  You’ll find
          their tyre pressure specifications in the vehicle handbook, the inside of the
          fuel filler cap, on the drivers door pillar or on the sun visor.
          To avoid issues with tyre pressure, make a quick check part of your regular
          vehicle maintenance routine.  Or when you stop at the petrol station to refuel,
          pull over to the tyre pressure gauge they probably have.  They’re normally
          free to use and it only takes a few moments to check the pressure and make
          any required changes.

          Tyre Rotation & our New Tyres
          Tyres tend to wear faster on the front axle.  In extreme cases, this can mean
          enough of a difference between front and rear to throw out your 4×4’s gearing
          ratio.  To prevent any issues, we recommend rotating your tyres every
          10,000kms.  The average Kiwi male travels just over 12,000kms per year
          (according to the Department of Transport), so that means rotating your tyres
          every 10 months or so.  The average kiwi female travels just over 8000kms
          per year, which would mean a rotation is needed every 15 months or so.

          FEATHERING
          Tires are “feathered” when the tread is smooth on one side and sharp on another. This is usually a sign of poor toe alignment.

          CAMBER WEAR
          This strain of tread wear means the inside or outside of the tread is significantly more worn than the center of the tread. As its name implies, positive or negative camber causes this type of wear.

          HEEL/TOE WEAR
          This happens when one side of your tread blocks wears down more quickly than the other in a circumferential direction. When you run your hand over the tread, it will look and feel like saw teeth when viewed from the side. Heel/toe wear could be a sign of under inflation and/or lack of rotation.
          If you’re experiencing any of these unusual wear patterns, you should have a technician check your alignment. While tire wear prevention is a good reason to keep your wheel alignment in check, the consequences of misalignment can also play out

          in overall vehicle performance. A car that pulls to one side or steers erratically, for example, probably has an alignment problem.

          TIRE BALANCING

          Distinct from tire alignment, tire or wheel balancing refers to compensation for any weight imbalances in the tire/wheel combination and is often performed in conjunction with wheel alignment. There are two basic types of tire/wheel imbalance
          that need correction – static (single plane) and dynamic (dual plane). Static balance addresses balance on only one plane – vertical movement which can cause vibration. A dynamic imbalance, on the other hand, addresses balance in two planes – vertical movement and lateral movement . Both types of imbalance require the use of a special balancing machine to help even things out. To begin balancing your tires, a technician will mount them on the correct rims and adjust the pressure to optimal inflation. Then each tire goes on the center bore of a balancing machine. The machine spins the tire at a high speed to measure the wheel/tire combination imbalance. It signals how much weight the tech should add to balance out the tire and the areas where said weight is needed.
          Tire balancing is essential for proper tire care for the same reason as wheel alignment: prevention of premature tread wear. Having tires aligned and balanced every 5,000 to 6,000 miles can help maximize their lifespan and overall performance.

          As with all things, prices vary greatly for tyres.  But whether you pay $100 or $500, you’ll still want to get as much value from them as you can.  The only way to do that is to look after them.  Just put the tyres on and forget about them, you run the risk of reducing the return you get for your spend.  And that’s just annoying.  So how do you do it?  How do you make the most of your new tyres?
          It really comes down to three main factors.  Tyre alignment, tyre pressure and tyre rotation.  Let’s tackle tyre alignment first.
          Tyre Alignment & Your New Tyres

          When you get your new tyres fitted, you’re almost certain to have them aligned.  But here’s the thing.  That piece of fine alignment work can soon be thrown out.  Hit a few potholes or kerbs, you’ll soon find you’ve compromised the wheel alignment.  How will you know?  You might not notice at all.  You might feel your vehicle pull to the side.  In this instance, it means uneven forces are applied to different parts of the tyre.  The result is uneven tyre wear.
          Uneven tyre wear is just annoying.  Sure, it’s annoying having to take your vehicle in for an alignment but that’s nothing compared to the frustration of throwing a tyre away that’s 90% good and only 10% bad.  Because that is what might happen.  When that alignment is out you get uneven tyre wear. So come WOF time, that small patch that’s now below the legal minimum for tread depth is enough to mean you need a new tyre, despite 90% of the tyre looking like new.  It’s like buying a fancy pair of shoes and having to chuck them if they get a small scuff.

          How Long Will Your New Tyres Last?

          The equation to use is: P(03)-2 x T3 squared.
          Where P is equal to a crystal ball and T is equal to ‘who knows’. Seriously, who knows.  It really depends on what you drive, how you drive and where you drive.  Not to mention what tyre you have.  There is no magic formula and the variation is huge.  The only thing you can do is try and make sure you look after your tyres.  So, to recap…to get the best out of your new tyres:

          Do the above and you are doing everything in your control.

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